FLASH FICTION:-- HORROR, SCI-FI, HUMOUR, CRIME, SLICE OF LIFE, ETC.

Friday, 23 November 2012

Monster


It preferred to attack from above. It had used other methods of attack, learning more with each kill, but its natural instinct was to drop from above and bite, and it was without doubt a creature of instinct.

The whole city was in a state of panic. Since the first horrifically mutilated corpses had been discovered pairs of guards had been posted at every street corner, armed patrols drove around the streets during the dark hours, people stayed in their homes whenever possible.

One victim each day, for ninety seven consecutive days.

Forensics and pathology tests had given very little in the way of help. They had proven the creature was not human. The wounds suggested teeth and bite size comparable with that of a six-foot shark. A six digit paw with four central fingers and an opposing thumb at either end, razor sharp claws of two to three inches long, and superhuman strength.

The wounds also suggested the victims died as a result of massive blood loss due to extensive lacerations to the neck and throat.

There was little left of the victims' main body, upper arms and thighs to glean any clues from, for the creature had a voracious appetite.

The whole city walked in fear of this monster.

* * * * *

The creature had no concept of right or wrong, and would probably have been deeply offended to learn it was thought of as a monster.

For it knew of love, adoration, loyalty, obedience.

It was a pet, accidentally abandoned when its master's ship had landed briefly to undertake repairs. By the time its absence had been discovered the distance and time involved, coupled with the shortage of fuel made it impossible to return for it. There would be many years of grief and guilt before its master would come to terms with the loss of his beloved faithful companion.

Of course the creature knew nothing of this, it only knew its master was no longer there, his soothing voice and gentle hand no longer a comfort, the food no longer given.

Many generations have gone by since the Monster's own kind needed to hunt to survive, since domestication the knowledge and skills had been lost through lack of use and time itself... almost.

And now, for the first time in its life, and through no fault of its own, it had been forced to fend for itself. Luckily for the creature the food source was easy prey. Each night it hunted, ate, then slept.

As the creature also had no concept of time it lived in constant expectation of its master appearing, calling, throwing its toy.

It finished its meal, then bounded off into the nearby woodland, climbed high into a tree, a full belly and an innocent heart brought sleep quickly and naturally.

For whatever the creature was or was not, it only killed to eat, to survive, never for sport or amusement.

Unlike some creatures.... Who branded it a monster.


©2012 Stephen. J. Green.

24 comments:

  1. reminded me of Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein's" existential loneliness & abandonment

    marc nash

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    1. I like the parallel you have drawn here Marc, neither of them asked for the predicament they were forced into.

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  2. This MUST be made into a major feature film. Sort of like ET, but with claws.

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    1. Katherine, thank you so much for this comment, it would be lovely to think that the film companies were knocking on my door, if only... :-)

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  3. Oh this was so good - I liked both POV but I felt so sad for the creature, after all it was only doing what it needed to survive. LEAVE THE CREATURE ALONE! ^__^ (as long as it doesn't eat me, I like it.)

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    1. I think it would be nice if the people of the city left a meal out for the creature each day, but I think it more likely that the creature will eventually pay for its crimes.

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  4. I loved this. Beautifully done.

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    1. Thank you Catherine, although I don't count this as one of my stronger pieces, I do like the idea. Animals are so often condemned just for behaving in the way nature intended them to, like sharks for example, we invade their natural habitat, but are quite often surprised when things go tragically wrong.

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  5. I liked this. As vicious as the "monster" is, there's still reason for sympathy.

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    1. Hi Larry, yes, the creature will eventually be hunted down and destroyed, but it would be no more guilty than a fox attacking a chicken coop, there is no malice to their actions.

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  6. The scariest and most vicious monsters are those who believe they are doing nothing wrong.

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    1. Hi Tim, this is true, I would more likely view this as a human trait though than an animal. Those who can purposefully injure or kill without thinking they are doing any wrong.

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  7. Poor thing!
    A simple thing as waiting for its toy to be thrown, or the lack of wanted comfort and love, are enough reasons for this unknown creature to not be judged. And I feel for it knowing it has to face the real monsters, those who will hunt and kill for pleasure.

    Very good story!

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    1. Your sympathy would be well placed Cindy, but once the people have plucked up the courage I think a hunting circus would be on the agenda.

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  8. An interesting perspective on how our perception of the unknown is often inaccurate (and how we never turn the same lens on our own actions). I enjoyed this story, Steve!

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    1. Thank you Dawn, our own species has a lot to live down, doesn't it?

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  9. I actually felt deeply sorry for it, a bit like an over exuberant St Bernard who just wants to go home. And yes, it kills because it needs to, unlike its victims who do it for the sheer fun of it.

    I'll give it a home, if it wants one?

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    1. I think it would very much like a home Icy, but it is unlikely the poor thing will get its wish.

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  10. I enjoyed this and agree with its message. Had a bit of a difficult time imagining it as a pet, but the backstory works. Well written, as always.

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    1. Thanks Richard, I suppose the situation would be similar to that of a dog abandoned in the wild, to survive it would have to revert back to hunting for its food.

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  11. Hi there Steve -- great story. Anything that starts with 'It preferred to attack from above' is a story I've got to read. I liked the change in interpretation, starting with the populace, shifting to the 'monster'. The creature was unusual, which was good, and I did like the concept that squeaky toy + can of monster food would still be welcome, even though it's currently abandoned and fending for self. I concur with Icy: a big, huggable St. Bernard... that'd eat your face off ;) St.

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    1. Hi Stephen, and thanks for the great feedback. I think this monster would gladly prefer its squeaky toy and can of monster food to the life it has been forced into.

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  12. You have been nominated! For more details see this post http://wp.me/p218fu-8h ! ^^

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    1. Aw thank you Cindy, I accept my nomination with pride, thank you so much for including me in your list. :-)

      It may be a few days before I can get around to publishing my own list, but I will do it as soon as I find the time.

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